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Medical Device Integration Blog

Be Prepared!

Posted by Cyndi Coyne, RN on Sep 22, 2015 @ 04:00 AM


In addition to being a nurse, I have been the proud mom to a Boy Scout for quite some time now.  He absolutely loves the Scouts and it’s been a wonderful experience for him.  I have to admit, he is growing and maturing into quite a fine young man and, with the help of great Scout Masters as well as a lot of hard work on his part, he’s developed leadership skills that he would’ve had a hard time acquiring outside of Scouts.  His ultimate goal is to become an Eagle Scout.  He is well on his way and I have no doubt he will attain it.

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Tags: Nurses, Nursing Stories, Clinical, Clinical Analytics, Nurses Week, Clinical Documentation

Five life lessons I learned from a nurse

Posted by W. Jeffrey Rice on May 13, 2015 @ 04:30 AM

Mother’s Day and National Nurses Week are two celebrations that for me fall perfectly into place. I have always been grateful to have a mother who raised me to have strong values, high morals, and integrity. However, until now I never considered how many of these traits came directly from her role as a Registered Nurse. Throughout her career she demonstrated her belief system through her actions, how she cared for her patients and the experiences she shared.

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Tags: Nurses, Nursing Stories, Nurses Week

Healthcare IT: A Nurse’s Revealing Perspective

Posted by Cyndi Coyne, RN on Nov 19, 2014 @ 02:54 PM

Hey! IT departments, CIOs, CNIOs! Did you know that your nurses are NOT happy!?! The results of a survey by Black Book Market Research were just released and it isn’t good. More than 13,000 nurses were surveyed for Black Book’s EHR Loyalty Poll and, I’ll warn you, what they had to say may be very tough to hear.

Nurses’ dissatisfaction with their electronic health record system is at an all-time high with 92% saying they were unhappy with the EMR system in their healthcare facility. That’s a shockingly high number!

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Tags: Patient Care, Patient Safety, Nurses, Workflow, Health IT, Healthcare Technology, Nursing Stories, Clinical, Healthcare IT Departments

Wish List

Posted by Halley Cooksey, RN on Nov 13, 2014 @ 10:18 AM

The holiday season seems to have officially kicked off this past weekend. It seems to happen earlier each year. Gone are all the witches, bats, and ghoul decorations. In their place are festive trees strung with lights, with only the occasional Thanksgiving turkey to break things up. Soon we’ll face the barrage of commercials advertising the countless ways we can spend our holiday budgets. Many of us will spend hours listening to our children and grandchildren describe in very finite detail all the things they have placed on their wish list and how they promise to behave so they’ll get as many of the coveted gifts as possible.

Like our children, as adults we also have wish lists for our toys and that can extend into our professional lives. As nurses we have wish lists for things that will make our work life not only easier, but also allow us to truly practice our profession – caring for patients. Do you have a wish list? What sort of things do you wish for to help you in your daily practice? Do you wish for the kind of technology that can enhance your nursing practice and not hinder or slow it down? We know that no amount of technology will ever be able to replace our assessment skills, our ability to connect with a patient or their family members. There isn’t any form of technology that can console them during a very trying time; nor can technology wipe away a tear or put a band-aid over an injection site. However, we also know that technology can help free up the time for us to give our patients the kind of attention they need and that we want to provide.

If you could create a wish list of the things technology could do for you as nurse, what would you put on it and why? Would you wish for tools that could decrease the amount of time you spend documenting in a patient’s record? Or, perhaps a technology that could help you see the subtle changes in your patients and could alert you that they are beginning to decline and are in need further intervention? We want to hear your thoughts!

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Tags: Medical Device Connectivity, Medical Device Integration, Nurses, Health IT, Healthcare Technology, Nursing Stories, Medical Device Information System, Clinical, Clinical Documentation

The Pecking Order of Device Integration

Posted by Halley Cooksey, RN on Sep 26, 2014 @ 03:16 PM

When I first became a nurse, one of my favorite questions to be asked was “What kind of nurse are you?” The fine print of this question, of course, is “where in the hospital do you work?” I would swell with pride and proudly state that I was an “ER” nurse.

As far as I was concerned (at that time) an ER nurse was the best kind of nurse anyone could be. Sure, working in the critical care area must have its challenges, but how hard is it to take care of an intubated patient who I had so kindly stabilized for you? As for the nurses on the floor, I mean, really? These patients were of the walkie-talkie population. Hang a few bags of IVs, push a little Lasix and remind your nurse tech to measure their output. Obviously nothing compares to the ER.

Fast forward many years to today and I have to tell you what an awakening I have had. After leaving the ER for a myriad of reasons, I crossed over to the dark-side of nursing … also affectionately known as “HIT”. It was during my years working as a clinical systems analyst that everything I thought I knew about med-surg floors made me realize that I had no concept of what it was to walk in their shoes and understand what their workflow was all about.

The nurses who worked on the med-surg unit were taking care of a complex, diverse group of patients with varying degrees of acuity; more times than not, without the assistance or extra set of helping hands of a patient care tech, because the patient care tech was in a room with a confused geriatric patient who couldn’t be left alone. I watched these nurses document on napkins, scrubs and sometimes bed sheets all while taking phone calls from different doctors and receiving orders. Additionally, they were working with social services, the hospice nurse and every other visitor who decided to stop them in the hall and ask about their loved ones. I remember thinking, who signs up for this gig? To say the least, I was humbled by their dedication.

The big picture of this is that “floor” nurses are the ones in need of technology to complement their workflow and not impede it. Technology should not be seen as “big brother” watching over their shoulders, but as an extra set of eyes to help them do what they do best: take care of patients.

Interestingly enough, though, med-surg units are typically that last areas to be thought of for medical device integration. Walk into any critical care area and you’ll likely see monitors feeding to a central station that, in turn, feeds directly to an EMR. Ventilators are cutting edge and their data is flowing to the EMR, as well. Conversely, walk onto a med-surg unit and you’ll likely observe nurses with tattoos of vital signs up and down their arms, or on scraps of paper that they will later transcribe. Their patients’ data is just as important as the patients sitting in the critical care unit or ER, right?

So, here’s an interesting thought to ponder: Typically, there are more med-surg beds in a facility than ER beds and critical care beds combined; therefore, there are more med-surg nurses working at any given time than there are in all the other areas put together. The med-surg areas are the backbone of the hospital. As a general cultural oddity, why is it that these areas are the last to get connected? Why are they not seen as mission critical like other areas of the hospital?

I’d like to hear your opinion as to why this is the case and how we can change this thought process.

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Tags: Medical Device Connectivity, Nurses, Nursing Stories, Clinical, Med-Surg

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