Medical Device Integration Blog

Healthcare Technology Can be Hazardous to Your Health

Posted by Monica Demers on Mar 29, 2015 @ 02:07 PM

Blog Series: Medical Device Integration Addresses Multiple Health Technology Hazards

Caution: Healthcare technology can be hazardous to your health—if it isn’t managed properly, that is. No organization knows this better than the ECRI Institute—the nationally recognized nonprofit that researches the best approaches to improving patient care.  Each year, ECRI’s Top 10 Health Technology Hazards List has been helping providers identify and address major technology-related problems that can impede clinician effectiveness and compromise patient safety.

Tags: Medical Device Connectivity, Alarms and Alerts, Alarm Fatigue, Health IT, clinical analytics, Medical Device Data

Healthcare IT: A Nurse’s Revealing Perspective

Posted by Cyndi Coyne, RN on Nov 19, 2014 @ 02:54 PM

Hey! IT departments, CIOs, CNIOs! Did you know that your nurses are NOT happy!?! The results of a survey by Black Book Market Research were just released and it isn’t good. More than 13,000 nurses were surveyed for Black Book’s EHR Loyalty Poll and, I’ll warn you, what they had to say may be very tough to hear.

Nurses’ dissatisfaction with their electronic health record system is at an all-time high with 92% saying they were unhappy with the EMR system in their healthcare facility. That’s a shockingly high number!

Tags: Patient Care, Patient Safety, Nurses, Workflow, Health IT, Healthcare Technology, Nursing Stories, Clinical, Healthcare IT Departments

Wish List

Posted by Halley Cooksey, RN on Nov 13, 2014 @ 10:18 AM

The holiday season seems to have officially kicked off this past weekend. It seems to happen earlier each year. Gone are all the witches, bats, and ghoul decorations. In their place are festive trees strung with lights, with only the occasional Thanksgiving turkey to break things up. Soon we’ll face the barrage of commercials advertising the countless ways we can spend our holiday budgets. Many of us will spend hours listening to our children and grandchildren describe in very finite detail all the things they have placed on their wish list and how they promise to behave so they’ll get as many of the coveted gifts as possible.

Like our children, as adults we also have wish lists for our toys and that can extend into our professional lives. As nurses we have wish lists for things that will make our work life not only easier, but also allow us to truly practice our profession – caring for patients. Do you have a wish list? What sort of things do you wish for to help you in your daily practice? Do you wish for the kind of technology that can enhance your nursing practice and not hinder or slow it down? We know that no amount of technology will ever be able to replace our assessment skills, our ability to connect with a patient or their family members. There isn’t any form of technology that can console them during a very trying time; nor can technology wipe away a tear or put a band-aid over an injection site. However, we also know that technology can help free up the time for us to give our patients the kind of attention they need and that we want to provide.

If you could create a wish list of the things technology could do for you as nurse, what would you put on it and why? Would you wish for tools that could decrease the amount of time you spend documenting in a patient’s record? Or, perhaps a technology that could help you see the subtle changes in your patients and could alert you that they are beginning to decline and are in need further intervention? We want to hear your thoughts!

Tags: Medical Device Connectivity, Medical Device Integration, Nurses, Health IT, Healthcare Technology, Nursing Stories, Medical Device Information System, MDIS, Clinical, Clinical Documentation

Applying Technology in Nursing: Lessons to be Learned From Other Industries

Posted by Karen Lund, RN BSN on Nov 04, 2014 @ 10:17 AM

Technology will not replace nurses at the bedside, but applied appropriately can enable nurses to work smarter rather than harder, and help alleviate some of our complex practice issues. Yes, we need better staffing ratios, work environments and benefits for when our aging baby boomer population requires more care.  But we also need to provide nurses with the right technology tools and support to enable them to deliver the best care possible.  In fact, if we can make nursing “cool” from a technology perspective, then perhaps more young people would be attracted to the profession and help alleviate some of our nursing shortage. 

Just as nursing theory has drawn from professions like psychology, sociology, physiology, anthropology and other disciplines to create better nursing practices, we should also draw from cutting edge technologies to help us provide better and more efficient care at the bedside.  For example, just as manufacturing applied Toyota’s “lean” strategy, nursing has started applying it to health care by giving nurses the power to change their environment to support their ability to deliver better patient care.  But there are still many, many ideas we can borrow from other industries. Waiters in restaurants, for example, can order food from the kitchen using a handheld device while customers are giving their food order.

As nurses, we should be able to order and/or charge supplies, chart medications, take and post pictures and chart all from one device. Nurses should be able to monitor patient vital signs, and automatically record changes to the Electronic Medical Record (EMR) and receive notification of trending changes. 

The technology solutions to achieve these simple, yet time and resource consuming tasks is available today, but have sadly been slow to adopt. I challenge you to ask you hospital why not? Why aren’t they using the technology that would help nurse to give better, more efficient, safer care to patients?

Tags: Medical Device Connectivity, Medical Device Integration, Healthcare Technology, Medical Device Information System, Medical Device Data

Slow Down To Achieve Expected Results with Medical Device Integration in Med-Surg

Posted by Ken Choquette on Oct 15, 2014 @ 03:00 PM

“Slow Down” may not be words people use when talking about device integration.  Not all device integration initiatives are created equal.  Achieving results within med-surg units requires a bit more clinical involvement than it does in a higher acuity unit. 

Frequently, organizations want to move too fast, which undermines the value of integrating devices in these units, frustrates the implementation team, and worse, destroys end user adoption.  Neglecting the clinicians’ workflow or not conducting a network assessment in the med-surg area could render the system as unusable.  Usually, this is the result of not involving the implementation team in the device integration roll-out and hence, they’re not understanding the issue(s) you are trying to solve.

The decision for device integration in med-surg is the “starting gun” to set goals and to set the finish line.  Start by finding a baseline. 

  • What are you trying to solve with device integration in med-surg? 
  • Who currently collects the data?  How is it collected? 
  • How is data entered into the patient record?  
  • How much clinical time does documentation take away from nursing? 

We know that these are not always the easiest answers to obtain prior to integration, but knowing the current state from start to finish will help an organization set the right expectations for how device integration can improve the efficiency and safety of the existing workflows – and better yet, quantify it.

By taking a little time in beginning of the project – by SLOWING down at the start – your implementation will stay on track and result in FAST adoption and a success story for all to share.

Tags: Medical Device Connectivity, Medical Device Integration, implementation, Medical Device Infrastructure

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